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Hey there,
my name is Tyler and this is my resume. :)

About Me

I am a student of the social and applied cognitive sciences.
As a PhD candidate, I study one of the cognitive factors that leads individuals to perceive others as competitors (a type of cognition that I call "zero-sum thinking"); previously, my Master's thesis examined the Uncanny Valley. I am also a student of behaviour change (so-called "nudging"), particularly the techniques of Community-Based Social Marketing.

I am a self-taught software engineer.
I started programming when I was 12. It all started with Final Fantasy VII. I wanted to build the BEST fansite. So I studied and hacked HTML source code, learning how things worked through trial and error. After a lot of error, I built a site ("The Final Fantasy 7 Dungeon"), and even got it indexed by the Yahoo! search directory (this was back when Yahoo! was still cool). The Internet has changed a lot since then, and so have my aspirations, but I still have the same basic curiosity.

I am passionate about environmentalism, social justice, and science.

Education

  • 2016

    Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Psychology

    University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada. My doctoral thesis investigates the psychology of zero-sum thinking.

  • 2011

    Master of Arts (MA), Psychology

    Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. My thesis was titled: Does the uncanny valley exist? An empirical test of the relationship between eeriness and the human likeness of digitally created faces.

  • 2009

    B.A.H., Psychology, with Computer Science Minor

    Bishop’s University, Quebec, Canada. My honour's thesis was titled: Terror management theory and human affect in response to computer generated voices.

Work and Volunteer Experiences

Project Neutral
2015-Present
Consultant, Program Evaluation
I have been working with Project Neutral to evaluate their program.
eMERGE Guelph
2013-Present
Consultant, Software Development
I work with the folks at eMERGE Guelph to design and evaluate social marketing programs that promote sustainability. I develop and maintain the software used in the Home Visit program. I have also developed a Lighting Assessment application that audits home lighting and determines the benefits of installing LED lightbulbs.
OPIRG-Guelph
2012-2015
Board of Directors, Financial Liaison
As a member of the Board of Directors, I was responsible for overseeing staff and financial management, organizing and facilitating meetings, and consensus-based decision-making.
Carleton/UofG
2010-2015
Graduate Teaching Assistant
I was a teaching assistant for the following courses: Cognitive Psychology, Non-Experimental Research Methods, Introductory Psychology, and Design and Analysis in Psychological Research.

Academic Awards

Uni. of Guelph
2014
SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship
National competition, valued at $20,000/yr for 2 years.
Uni. of Guelph
2013
Ontario Graduate Scholarship (OGS)
Provincial competition, valued at $15,000.
Bishop's Uni.
2009
Certificate of Academic Excellence
Awarded by the Canadian Psychological Association in recognition of an outstanding academic achievement.

Academic Publications

Ferrey, A., Burleigh, T. J., & Fenske, M. (2015). Stimulus-category competition, inhibition and affective devaluation: A novel account of the Uncanny Valley. Frontiers in Psychology. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00249    
Burleigh, T. J. & Schoenherr, J. R. (2015) A reappraisal of the uncanny valley: Categorical perception or frequency-based sensitization? Frontiers in Psychology, 5:1488. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01488    
Burleigh, T. J. & Schoenherr, J. R. (2015) Uncanny sociocultural categories. Frontiers in Psychology, 5:1456. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01456    
Burleigh, T. J., Schoenherr, J. R., & Lacroix, G. L. (2013). Does the uncanny valley exist? An empirical test of the relationship between eeriness and the human likeness of digitally created faces. Computers in Human Behavior, 29(3), 759-771. doi: 10.1016/j.chb.2012.11.021    
Burleigh, T. J., & Meegan, D. V. (2013). Keeping up with the Joneses affects perceptions of distributive justice. Social Justice Research, 26(2), 120-131. doi: 10.1007/s11211-013-0181-3    

Contact

tburleig@uoguelph.ca
Google Scholar

Other Sites

Mechanical Turk Tutorials

Programming

HTML
CSS
jQuery
PHP/SQL
AngularJS
Beginner
Proficient
Expert
Master

Psychology

Social
Behaviour Change
Cognitive
Affective
Evolutionary
Beginner
Proficient
Expert
Master

Interests

Environmentalism
Social Justice
Science
Cooking
Horticulture
Settlers of Catan
Katamari Damacy
Dune
The Singularity
Uncanny Valley
Cats
Cryptocurrency